Yesterday’s News: The Best Stories That You Didn’t Read This Week

2013-03-23 00.18.03

#MsKluender went on a trip for work this week so my stack of newspapers was cut short by a few days, not that I’m complaining.

Be forewarned, these are not necessarily the biggest stories or the ones that I should be reading (no assigned homework here). These are the few pieces of journalism that drew me in and informed me. For reference I am provided with The New York TimesThe Wall Street Journal,Financial TimesSan Francisco Chronicle, and USA Today.

High Priest of App Design, at Home in Philly
Jessica E. Lessin profiles the tastemaker behind some of the best features in the apps you use.

Built Not to Last
Alan Murray reviews ‘Digital Disruption’ and asks if it is nothing more than a marketing pamphlet for Forrester Research.

You Really Can’t Eat Just One, And Here’s the Reason
Scott Mowbray reviews ‘Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us’ by Michael Moss, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for The New York Times.

Spreading Disruption, Shaking Up Cable TV
David Carr looks at a future of broadcast television minus retransmission fees (resulting in cheaper fees for customers).

Saving Lions by Killing Them
Alexander N. Songorwa, director of wildlife for the Tanzanian Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism, states the need for cash from sanctioned wildlife hunters to fund successful conservation efforts.

The Facebook Meeting Room is Too Cool for Women
Lucy Kellaway supports cooler temperatures at work but finds that men may be at a biological advantage in frigid board rooms.

Facebook Takes Aim at Apps Makers
Evelyn M. Rusli explores whether Facebook is cutting ties with third-party apps because of a lack of value for its users or strict competition with the social media platform’s offerings.

Good News Beats Bad on Social Media
John Tierney looks at research that says articles that make readers sad are shared less frequently on social media.

A Risk for Films That Move at a Zombie’s Pace
Michael Cieply examines the pitfalls of movies that take years to make.

Unwanted Electronic Gear Rising in Toxic Piles
Ian Urbina digs up some dirt on the world of electronics whose outdated parts make them victims of abandonment on their way to recycling.

A New Effort in Boston to Catch 1990 Art Thieves
Katharine Q. Seelye updates the art heist from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum with the latest from the F.B.I.

Such Tweet Sorrow
Peter Hartlaub examines the final tweets of (semi) celebrities and wonders if Jim Harbaugh will return.

Yesterday’s News: The Best Stories That You Didn’t Read This Week

2013-03-16 11.30.45As usual, #MsKluender brought home stacks of newspapers this week and I didn’t get around to flipping through them until late last night and early this morning. Be forewarned, these are not necessarily the biggest stories or the ones that I should be reading (no assigned homework here). These are the few pieces of journalism that drew me in and informed me.

For reference I am provided with The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, San Francisco Chronicle, and USA Today.

How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia
Krys Lee reviews the fictional self-help book from Mohsin Hamid.

Living With Less. A Lot Less.
TreeHugger.com’s Graham Hill explores his life now that he has discarded his many possessions.

The Price of Marriage
Brook Larmer takes us inside the pursuit of spouses in China, from a mother’s mission to find a wife for her son to a rich bachelor relying on a small army of matchmakers to secure a mate.

Made to Order
Alec Scott examines three creative couples pursuing unique design in their homes.

Innovation Elusive, But Bravado Abundant
James Temple questions the level of innovation coming out of Silicon Valley.

Help Wanted!
Spencer E. Ante discusses the need for employees who can interpret big data.

Click for Career Enhancement
Nick Wingfield looks at the companies offering creative, online courses and the people using them to build their CV.

For Marvel Comics, a Renewed Digital Mission
Brooks Barnes highlights the comic book powerhouses renewed efforts to bring digital content to fans.

Struggling ‘Life of Pi’ Special-Effects House Attracts a Bidder
Ben Fritz briefly discusses the bankruptcy and impending sale of the Oscar-winning visual effects company behind ‘Life of Pi’.

Getting the Journalism You Pay For
L. Gordon Crovitz examines the difficulties faced by freelance journalists when publishers seek free content.

Power Players Hooked on Netflix Series
Carla Marinucci and Wyatt Buchanan examine the popularity of ‘House of Cards’ among the movers and shakers in government.

Yesterday’s News: The Stories That Were Overshadowed by Facebook and SXSW This Week

IMG_5383As usual, #MsKluender brought home stacks of newspapers this week and I didn’t get around to flipping through them until today. Be forewarned, these are not necessarily the biggest stories (your Twitter feed is probably already full of dispatches from SXSW or Facebook News Feed updates) or the ones that I should be reading (no assigned homework here). These are the few pieces of journalism that drew me in and informed me.

For reference I am provided with The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, San Francisco Chronicle, and USA Today.

Lifeline Service for the Poor Goes Cellular
Kevin Fagan covers how California’s poor will soon have access to free cell services and phones.

‘City’ Offers Lesson Plans
Benny Evangelista discusses the latest version of “SimCity” and how it will help students hone their STEM skills.

Endangered or Not, but at Least No Longer Waiting
Michael Wines investigates the waiting game behind becoming an endangered species.

Open Jobs and Good Candidates, but employers Won’t Commit
Catherine Rampell discovers why employers aren’t pulling the trigger as they string along qualified candidates.

Check It Out: This Is Not Your Father’s Dewey Decimal System
Greg Toppo explores how libraries are lending new products, like heirloom seeds, through my favorite decimal system.

Last Stop, Adulthood, The Bronx
A.O. Scott allows others to review Oz the Great and Powerful this week, instead focusing on this unique film about adolescents on a bus.

Bar Shuffleboard: Beer, Yes; Sticks, No
Adam W. Kepler reviews the game that is taking over many of New York’s bars (full disclosure: I played this in NY years ago and loved it).

Reselling the E-Goods
David Streitfeld asks “Why can’t we resell our used e-books?”

To Place Graduates, Law Schools Are Opening Firms
Ethan Bronner sheds some light on the need for “teaching hospitals for law school graduates”.

A Hunter-Gatherer’s Wild Career
Emma Jacobs follows this Englishman into the woods to find out how he makes a mint each year selling wild plants to restaurants.

Bid to Ban Polar Bear Trade Fails
This news brief looks at the difficulty in protecting the polar bear from international trade.

Yesterday’s News: Online Media, Running Shoes, Hip-Hop, New Books/Shady Marketing, and More

IMG_5360Each night when my wife arrives home she drops a stack of newspapers on our coffee table. She knows how much I still like to flip through a physical paper after spending all day online. The stack usually grows throughout the week until I binge one morning with a cup of tea in pure silence. I usually tear out a few stories that I want to read and put them aside, many times never touching them again. In an effort to keep up on my reading I am therefore creating a weekly post. Each Saturday I will share the stories that forced me to stop flipping and read beyond the headlines. Mind you these are not necessarily the biggest stories (I usually already read those online) or the ones that I should be reading (no assigned homework here). These are the few pieces of journalism that drew me in and informed me.

For reference I am provided with The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, San Francisco Chronicle, and USA Today.

S.F. startup Inkling gives e-books a visual punch
Danielle Kucera explores how Inkling is making e-books interactive.

Logging Off To Trace A Web Photo To Its Source
David Carr follows the footsteps of a reporter who does the unthinkable – goes offline to report.

Apps vying to be the Instagram of mobile video
Tim Bradshaw rounds up some of the leading mobile video apps including Vine, Snapchat, and Cinemagram.

Unfriending Big Brother
Tom Shippey reviews Cory Doctorow’s Homeland. I read this after following the Bookish Twitter chat about Homeland this week.

When to Retire a Running Shoe
Gina Kolata probes the mystery every runner faces: when is it time to buy a new pair of sneaks?

Tweet For This Job ­– And It Could Be Yours
Bruce Horovitz examines attempts by companies to recruit using the popular social tool.

Avoiding Violent Images for an Anti-Poaching Campaign
Andrew Adam Newman looks at the World Wildlife Fund’s new ad campaign.

Getting to the Top: How Are Some Authors Landing On Best-Seller Lists? They’re Buying Their Way
Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg shines a light on the shady business of buying your way onto the best-seller lists.

A Hip-Hop Moment, But Is It Authentic?
Jon Caramanica assesses recent successes by Macklemore & Ryan Lewis and Baauer.

Agency struggles to bridge big divide
Peter Fimrite finds out why a name is important to hunters and animal welfare advocates.

Downton’s Not-So-Grim Reaper
Dave Itzkoff gets the skinny on why characters die on the popular show.

To Charm and Make Friends Fast: Share, Don’t Overshare
Elizabeth Bernstein learns why we need to be personal when making friends.

The Boy Wonder of Buzzfeed
Douglas Quenqua examines the accomplishments of Buzzfeed’s editor in chief.

New York Times Co. Selling ‘Boston Globe’
Roger Yu reports on the possible future sale of the nation’s 23rd largest newspaper, among others.

When You’ve Had One Meeting Too Many
Carson Tate examines this life of endless meetings that dominates corporate culture.

New screens require a new approach on TV content (Note: if you can find a working link please let me know in the comments section and I will add it on)
Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson examines the shifting landscape of content presentation from media companies given the growth in internet video consumption.

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