Let’s Not (with Some Irony): Commenting on the Complexity of an Issue

I recently wrote a post and then another about why the press release is not dead. These blossomed after reading one too many seasonal declarations by PR bloggers of the document’s untimely demise. I wrote those posts because I’m fed up with these posts and want the debates to end (yes, I appreciate the irony of adding to a discussion you are arguing should stop).

In a similar ironic twist I’m listing items that we should stop discussing so often as an industry. I do not think these topics need to be dropped completely, but it’s time to move the conversation forward and not rehashing issues. I’m tired of seeing the same questions or points arise when we either (a) want to be the first to share this information since everyone knows it or (b) are too lazy to search out the answer on our own so we post it on social media necessitating step (a) in a circle of life effect.

So let’s get started shall we? Here’s our first topic:

Commenting on posts by stating that issues are more complex than the article addressed.

If you start any comment with, “I agree with John Doe PR however we need to see this as a larger strategy…” please stop writing. Everything needs a larger strategy. Silver bullets only exist in fiction. No matter how simple something appears it obviously took many steps to get there. However, articles need to have focus and if the author addresses every issue involved, it will be either a book or the most boring, winding post you ever read. So in short, please stop doing this.

In the future I will post additional irritations that I generally feel only weaken our industry through their discussion on public forums. If you have one of your own, please leave it in the comments section below.

Disclaimer: I do not intend to add to the “bad blood” that circulates through such a competitive industry however by bringing these topics to the table I hope we can agree to move past them and focus on more positive topics.

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