Winnie the Pooh on…Social Media

UPDATE: More thoughts from Pooh and the gang here.

Winnie the Pooh and his friends had wonderful opinions about the world around them but who knew they shared such insight into social media and modern communications technology. Here are a few of their thoughts penned by A. A. Milne:

On Content Creation
“You can’t stay in your corner of the Forest waiting for others to come to you. You have to go to them sometimes.” 

On Twitter
“It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn’t use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like “What about lunch?”

Building a Following
“If the person you are talking to doesn’t appear to be listening, be patient. It may simply be that he has a small piece of fluff in his ear.” 

On Personal Facebook Posts
“People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.”

On Apple’s iOS6 Maps
“I’m not lost for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” 

On Blogging
“When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.”

On Google+ (and QR Codes)
“Bother.”

On LinkedIn
“So perhaps the best thing to do is to stop writing Introductions and get on with the book.”

On the Facebook IPO
“When you see someone putting on his Big Boots, you can be pretty sure that an Adventure is going to happen.” 

On Texting
“My spelling is Wobbly. It’s good spelling but it Wobbles, and the letters get in the wrong places.”

More on Texting
“TTFN, Ta Ta For Now.”

On Disaster Relief e-Fundraising
“And really, it wasn’t much good having anything exciting like floods, if you couldn’t share them with somebody.”

On Not Syncing Accounts
“One of the advantages of being disorganized is that one is always having surprising discoveries.”

Can you find any more quotes that apply? Maybe for Pinterest?

About these ads

16 thoughts on “Winnie the Pooh on…Social Media

  1. Pingback: If You Grew Up on Pooh … You might enjoy this! | 2×2 The Church Without a Building

  2. Thanks for making me laugh this morning….and causing me to think to dust off a book from my bookshelf: The Tao of Pooh, by Benjamin Hoff, published circa 1980. How do Tigger and Eeyore tacitly come across in your communications? How do Owl and Rabbit tacitly express themselves in your organization’s planning and execution?

    • Thank you for your comment Jill. I am glad to hear that the post gave you a chuckle. In regards to your questions, the lessons from A. A. Milne along with similar authors, can teach us not to over complicate situations and to see the simplicity within the chaos.

      • Yes how true, Brian! Scholarly Owl and Clever Rabbit don’t necessarily know the right answer or best path to take to achieve their objectives in the Hundred Acre Woods. Piglet and Tigger may not provide the best leadership given their timid and exuberant ways, respectively. Pooh’s results aren’t necessarily what he meant to do… but together they and their friends can provide us insights into the roles we each play and how we communicate with others.

  3. Pingback: The Winnie the Pooh guide to social media - Socially Savvy!

  4. Pingback: The Winnie-the-Pooh guide to social media « North Jersey Small Business Forum

  5. Pingback: Calvin and Hobbes on…Crisis Communications « BrianAdamsPR

  6. Pingback: Guest Blog by Brian Adams: “Calvin and Hobbes on…Crisis Communications” « Shank Public Relations Counselors

  7. Pingback: Guest Blog by Brian Adams: “Calvin and Hobbes on…Crisis Communications” | Shank Public Relations Counselors

  8. Pingback: The Calvin and Hobbes guide to crisis PR | The Cport

  9. Pingback: The Calvin and Hobbes guide to crisis PR « The Image Cartel

  10. Pingback: Calvin and Hobbes on... - Bernstein Crisis Management BlogBernstein Crisis Management Blog

  11. Pingback: More Winnie the Pooh on…Social Media « BrianAdamsPR

  12. Pingback: Winnie the Pooh on…Startups « BrianAdamsPR

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
The Esquire Theme.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 163 other followers

%d bloggers like this: